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EMBnet.digest August 2016
A Quick Guide to IMGT/Junction Analysis
Date Title Alternative name Author Body Body Body (body:language) Comment count Comment status Date Date Description Description Files Files (field_files:delta) Link(s) Link(s) (field_news_links:delta) Newsletter category Newsletter category (field_simplenews_term:language) Spotlight window Topic(s) Topic(s) (field_news_topic:delta) Author Body Post date Updated date Updated/commented date Updated date
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 0 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 2

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 0 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 3

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 0 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 4

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 0 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 5

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 0 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 6

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 1 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 0

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 1 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 1

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 1 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 2

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 1 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 3

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 1 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 4

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 1 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 5

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 1 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 6

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 2 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 0

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 2 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 1

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 2 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 2

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 2 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 3

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 2 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 4

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 2 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 5

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
12/Sep/2014 Social Media May Provide New Ways to Prepare for Public Response

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

0 Closed 0 2 social media, software development, public health, network dynamics, simulation science, modeling and simulation, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute 6

Researchers seeking specific symptoms or key phrases at specific locations can harvest tweets and use the information gathered to understand whether they have an epidemic or potentially threatening situation on their hands, and alert public health officials to take any necessary action.

“ChatterGrabber” software was designed under the auspices of a Modeling Infectious Disease Agent Study grant overseen by Stephen Eubank, deputy director of the Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory at The Virginia Tech Virginia Bioinformatics Institute.

Wed, 2014-09-10 14:08 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57 Fri, 2014-09-12 14:57
25/Aug/2014 Position for a Development Computer Scientist at IMGT (Montpellier, France)

Engineer position for deployment, maintenance and improvement of IMGT/HighV-QUEST, dedicated to the high-throughput analysis of sequences of antigen receptors (immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies and T cell receptors (TR)) from Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Duration: 36 months Position available mid september 2014.

This position is not available anymore.

Engineer position for deployment, maintenance and improvement of IMGT/HighV-QUEST, dedicated to the high-throughput analysis of sequences of antigen receptors (immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies and T cell receptors (TR)) from Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Duration: 36 months Position available mid september 2014.

This position is not available anymore.

0 Closed IMGT_Development Computer Scientist.pdf 0 0 job offer 0

Engineer position for deployment, maintenance and improvement of IMGT/HighV-QUEST, dedicated to the high-throughput analysis of sequences of antigen receptors (immunoglobulins (IG) or antibodies and T cell receptors (TR)) from Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Duration: 36 months Position available mid september 2014.

This position is not available anymore.

Fri, 2014-08-01 14:30 Mon, 2014-08-25 13:13 Mon, 2014-08-25 13:13 Mon, 2014-08-25 13:13
20/May/2014 Alternative splicing and Genome complexity

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

0 Closed 0 0 Alternative splicing, U6snRNPs, exon splicing 0

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

Fri, 2014-05-16 16:05 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50
20/May/2014 Alternative splicing and Genome complexity

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

0 Closed 0 0 Alternative splicing, U6snRNPs, exon splicing 1

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

Fri, 2014-05-16 16:05 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50
20/May/2014 Alternative splicing and Genome complexity

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

0 Closed 0 0 Alternative splicing, U6snRNPs, exon splicing 2

Gaurav Sablok, Marcel H Schulz, Xiaoyong Sun, Xuewen Wang and Nicola Vitulo launched the research topic 'Alternative splicing and Genome Complexity: Major players of genic diversity' in Frontiers in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology'.

Article submissions now open!

Deadline for abstract submission: 27 Jun 2014

Deadline for full article submission: 26 Sep 2014

The proposed research topic will host papers focused towards the development of methods for the analysis and prediction of splice variants and encourages methodological and systematic reviews illustrating recent technological advances of the field. We welcome research papers under the following categories:

  • Development of new algorithms and either standalone or web-based platforms for the identification of splice variants,
  • Systematic methodological reviews focusing on recent advances on genetic diversity in eukaryotic organisms through alternative splicing,
  • Benchmarking studies focusing on the construction of splice variants from experimental data,
  • Evolution, splice site diversity and conservation of splice variants and comparison across different species,
  • Identification of novel splice variants involved in physiological processes,
  • Statistical platforms to evaluate the performance of different sequencing technologies especially focusing on de-novo reconstruction of splice variants,
  • Statistical methodologies correlating alternative splicing events with expression complexity in time series experiments,
  • Review articles that report recent advances about the connection of alternative splicing with epigenetic modifications.

See more at: http://www.frontiersin.org/Journal/SpecialTopicDetail.aspx?name=bioinfor...

Fri, 2014-05-16 16:05 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50 Tue, 2014-05-20 13:50
15/Apr/2014 NETTAB 2014 & Crystal (cl)Year 2014, October 16-17, 2014, Torino, Italy

Dear members,

in the hope that it can be of your interest, I'm sending you some information on next NETTAB 2014 workshop and its joint meeting "2014: Crystal (cl)Year".

As you will see, the workshop will be held in Torino, quite near to the French border indeed, from October 16 to 17, 2014, at the Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC) of the local University.

The main theme of the NETTAB 2014 is "From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems biology".
Main topics relate to methods, tools, applications, and perspectives on structural bioinformatics, proteomics and integrative systems biology.

We have already agreed with BMC for the post workshop publication of two supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and of BMC Systems Biology including selected full papers from the workshop.

A synthesis of the main information is reported here below.

You will find the complete call for abstracts and much more information in the events' web sites:
NETTAB 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/
CCY 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

I hope you will be interested in submitting and attending.

Please don't hesitate to ask for any further information.

Best regards.

Paolo Romano

=====

NETTAB 2014
From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems
biology
October 15-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/

Keynote Speakers
* Wolfgang Marwan, Otto-von-Guericke Universität, Magdeburg, Germany
* Ram Samudrala, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
* Torsten Schwede, University of Basel, Switzerland
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel (Nobel
Laureate)

Important dates
* Submission of abstracts for oral communications: July 21, 2014
* Submission of abstracts for posters: September 1, 2014
* Early registration deadline: July 31, 2014

Instructions for abstract submission
Authors are invited to submit abstracts through EasyChair at:
https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=nettab2014 .
Abstract length should not exceed 4 pages for oral communications and 2
pages for posters. Accepted abstracts will be printed in the conference proceedings.

Post-workshop publication
Two special issues will appear as supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and
of BMC Systems Biology. The related Call for papers will be launched shortly after the workshop.

Chairs
Francesca Cordero (University of Torino, Italy)
Paolo Romano (IRCCS AOU San Martino, Italy)
Torsten Schwede (University of Basel, Switzerland)

Under the Patronage of (confirmed only)
* Italian Society of Bioinformatics (BITS)
* Polish Bioinformatics Society (PTBI)
* Rete Ligure di Bioinformatica (ReLiB)

====

*2014: Crystal (cl)Year*
October 16-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

*Keynote Speakers*
* Eddy Arnold, Rutgers University, USA
* David Blake, NASA-AMES, USA
* Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University, USA (Nobel Laureate 2012)
* Paul Steinhardt, Princeton University, USA
* John Walker, MRC Cambridge, UK (Nobel Laureate 1997)
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute, IL (Nobel Laureate 2009)

*Travel Grants or Free Registrations will be available for Young Scientists*

*Under the Patronage of*
* Italian Association of Crystallography (AIC)
* European Crystallographic Association (ECA)
* International Union of Crystallography (IUCr)

Dear members,

in the hope that it can be of your interest, I'm sending you some information on next NETTAB 2014 workshop and its joint meeting "2014: Crystal (cl)Year".

As you will see, the workshop will be held in Torino, quite near to the French border indeed, from October 16 to 17, 2014, at the Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC) of the local University.

The main theme of the NETTAB 2014 is "From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems biology".
Main topics relate to methods, tools, applications, and perspectives on structural bioinformatics, proteomics and integrative systems biology.

We have already agreed with BMC for the post workshop publication of two supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and of BMC Systems Biology including selected full papers from the workshop.

A synthesis of the main information is reported here below.

You will find the complete call for abstracts and much more information in the events' web sites:
NETTAB 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/
CCY 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

I hope you will be interested in submitting and attending.

Please don't hesitate to ask for any further information.

Best regards.

Paolo Romano

=====

NETTAB 2014
From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems
biology
October 15-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/

Keynote Speakers
* Wolfgang Marwan, Otto-von-Guericke Universität, Magdeburg, Germany
* Ram Samudrala, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
* Torsten Schwede, University of Basel, Switzerland
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel (Nobel
Laureate)

Important dates
* Submission of abstracts for oral communications: July 21, 2014
* Submission of abstracts for posters: September 1, 2014
* Early registration deadline: July 31, 2014

Instructions for abstract submission
Authors are invited to submit abstracts through EasyChair at:
https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=nettab2014 .
Abstract length should not exceed 4 pages for oral communications and 2
pages for posters. Accepted abstracts will be printed in the conference proceedings.

Post-workshop publication
Two special issues will appear as supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and
of BMC Systems Biology. The related Call for papers will be launched shortly after the workshop.

Chairs
Francesca Cordero (University of Torino, Italy)
Paolo Romano (IRCCS AOU San Martino, Italy)
Torsten Schwede (University of Basel, Switzerland)

Under the Patronage of (confirmed only)
* Italian Society of Bioinformatics (BITS)
* Polish Bioinformatics Society (PTBI)
* Rete Ligure di Bioinformatica (ReLiB)

====

*2014: Crystal (cl)Year*
October 16-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

*Keynote Speakers*
* Eddy Arnold, Rutgers University, USA
* David Blake, NASA-AMES, USA
* Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University, USA (Nobel Laureate 2012)
* Paul Steinhardt, Princeton University, USA
* John Walker, MRC Cambridge, UK (Nobel Laureate 1997)
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute, IL (Nobel Laureate 2009)

*Travel Grants or Free Registrations will be available for Young Scientists*

*Under the Patronage of*
* Italian Association of Crystallography (AIC)
* European Crystallographic Association (ECA)
* International Union of Crystallography (IUCr)

0 Closed Torino2-ritaglio.jpg, nettab304_bestLogo.png 0 0 0

Dear members,

in the hope that it can be of your interest, I'm sending you some information on next NETTAB 2014 workshop and its joint meeting "2014: Crystal (cl)Year".

As you will see, the workshop will be held in Torino, quite near to the French border indeed, from October 16 to 17, 2014, at the Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC) of the local University.

The main theme of the NETTAB 2014 is "From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems biology".
Main topics relate to methods, tools, applications, and perspectives on structural bioinformatics, proteomics and integrative systems biology.

We have already agreed with BMC for the post workshop publication of two supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and of BMC Systems Biology including selected full papers from the workshop.

A synthesis of the main information is reported here below.

You will find the complete call for abstracts and much more information in the events' web sites:
NETTAB 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/
CCY 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

I hope you will be interested in submitting and attending.

Please don't hesitate to ask for any further information.

Best regards.

Paolo Romano

=====

NETTAB 2014
From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems
biology
October 15-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/

Keynote Speakers
* Wolfgang Marwan, Otto-von-Guericke Universität, Magdeburg, Germany
* Ram Samudrala, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
* Torsten Schwede, University of Basel, Switzerland
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel (Nobel
Laureate)

Important dates
* Submission of abstracts for oral communications: July 21, 2014
* Submission of abstracts for posters: September 1, 2014
* Early registration deadline: July 31, 2014

Instructions for abstract submission
Authors are invited to submit abstracts through EasyChair at:
https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=nettab2014 .
Abstract length should not exceed 4 pages for oral communications and 2
pages for posters. Accepted abstracts will be printed in the conference proceedings.

Post-workshop publication
Two special issues will appear as supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and
of BMC Systems Biology. The related Call for papers will be launched shortly after the workshop.

Chairs
Francesca Cordero (University of Torino, Italy)
Paolo Romano (IRCCS AOU San Martino, Italy)
Torsten Schwede (University of Basel, Switzerland)

Under the Patronage of (confirmed only)
* Italian Society of Bioinformatics (BITS)
* Polish Bioinformatics Society (PTBI)
* Rete Ligure di Bioinformatica (ReLiB)

====

*2014: Crystal (cl)Year*
October 16-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

*Keynote Speakers*
* Eddy Arnold, Rutgers University, USA
* David Blake, NASA-AMES, USA
* Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University, USA (Nobel Laureate 2012)
* Paul Steinhardt, Princeton University, USA
* John Walker, MRC Cambridge, UK (Nobel Laureate 1997)
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute, IL (Nobel Laureate 2009)

*Travel Grants or Free Registrations will be available for Young Scientists*

*Under the Patronage of*
* Italian Association of Crystallography (AIC)
* European Crystallographic Association (ECA)
* International Union of Crystallography (IUCr)

Tue, 2014-04-15 09:13 Tue, 2014-04-15 16:31 Tue, 2014-04-15 16:31 Tue, 2014-04-15 16:31
15/Apr/2014 NETTAB 2014 & Crystal (cl)Year 2014, October 16-17, 2014, Torino, Italy

Dear members,

in the hope that it can be of your interest, I'm sending you some information on next NETTAB 2014 workshop and its joint meeting "2014: Crystal (cl)Year".

As you will see, the workshop will be held in Torino, quite near to the French border indeed, from October 16 to 17, 2014, at the Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC) of the local University.

The main theme of the NETTAB 2014 is "From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems biology".
Main topics relate to methods, tools, applications, and perspectives on structural bioinformatics, proteomics and integrative systems biology.

We have already agreed with BMC for the post workshop publication of two supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and of BMC Systems Biology including selected full papers from the workshop.

A synthesis of the main information is reported here below.

You will find the complete call for abstracts and much more information in the events' web sites:
NETTAB 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/
CCY 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

I hope you will be interested in submitting and attending.

Please don't hesitate to ask for any further information.

Best regards.

Paolo Romano

=====

NETTAB 2014
From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems
biology
October 15-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/

Keynote Speakers
* Wolfgang Marwan, Otto-von-Guericke Universität, Magdeburg, Germany
* Ram Samudrala, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
* Torsten Schwede, University of Basel, Switzerland
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel (Nobel
Laureate)

Important dates
* Submission of abstracts for oral communications: July 21, 2014
* Submission of abstracts for posters: September 1, 2014
* Early registration deadline: July 31, 2014

Instructions for abstract submission
Authors are invited to submit abstracts through EasyChair at:
https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=nettab2014 .
Abstract length should not exceed 4 pages for oral communications and 2
pages for posters. Accepted abstracts will be printed in the conference proceedings.

Post-workshop publication
Two special issues will appear as supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and
of BMC Systems Biology. The related Call for papers will be launched shortly after the workshop.

Chairs
Francesca Cordero (University of Torino, Italy)
Paolo Romano (IRCCS AOU San Martino, Italy)
Torsten Schwede (University of Basel, Switzerland)

Under the Patronage of (confirmed only)
* Italian Society of Bioinformatics (BITS)
* Polish Bioinformatics Society (PTBI)
* Rete Ligure di Bioinformatica (ReLiB)

====

*2014: Crystal (cl)Year*
October 16-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

*Keynote Speakers*
* Eddy Arnold, Rutgers University, USA
* David Blake, NASA-AMES, USA
* Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University, USA (Nobel Laureate 2012)
* Paul Steinhardt, Princeton University, USA
* John Walker, MRC Cambridge, UK (Nobel Laureate 1997)
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute, IL (Nobel Laureate 2009)

*Travel Grants or Free Registrations will be available for Young Scientists*

*Under the Patronage of*
* Italian Association of Crystallography (AIC)
* European Crystallographic Association (ECA)
* International Union of Crystallography (IUCr)

Dear members,

in the hope that it can be of your interest, I'm sending you some information on next NETTAB 2014 workshop and its joint meeting "2014: Crystal (cl)Year".

As you will see, the workshop will be held in Torino, quite near to the French border indeed, from October 16 to 17, 2014, at the Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC) of the local University.

The main theme of the NETTAB 2014 is "From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems biology".
Main topics relate to methods, tools, applications, and perspectives on structural bioinformatics, proteomics and integrative systems biology.

We have already agreed with BMC for the post workshop publication of two supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and of BMC Systems Biology including selected full papers from the workshop.

A synthesis of the main information is reported here below.

You will find the complete call for abstracts and much more information in the events' web sites:
NETTAB 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/
CCY 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

I hope you will be interested in submitting and attending.

Please don't hesitate to ask for any further information.

Best regards.

Paolo Romano

=====

NETTAB 2014
From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems
biology
October 15-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/

Keynote Speakers
* Wolfgang Marwan, Otto-von-Guericke Universität, Magdeburg, Germany
* Ram Samudrala, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
* Torsten Schwede, University of Basel, Switzerland
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel (Nobel
Laureate)

Important dates
* Submission of abstracts for oral communications: July 21, 2014
* Submission of abstracts for posters: September 1, 2014
* Early registration deadline: July 31, 2014

Instructions for abstract submission
Authors are invited to submit abstracts through EasyChair at:
https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=nettab2014 .
Abstract length should not exceed 4 pages for oral communications and 2
pages for posters. Accepted abstracts will be printed in the conference proceedings.

Post-workshop publication
Two special issues will appear as supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and
of BMC Systems Biology. The related Call for papers will be launched shortly after the workshop.

Chairs
Francesca Cordero (University of Torino, Italy)
Paolo Romano (IRCCS AOU San Martino, Italy)
Torsten Schwede (University of Basel, Switzerland)

Under the Patronage of (confirmed only)
* Italian Society of Bioinformatics (BITS)
* Polish Bioinformatics Society (PTBI)
* Rete Ligure di Bioinformatica (ReLiB)

====

*2014: Crystal (cl)Year*
October 16-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

*Keynote Speakers*
* Eddy Arnold, Rutgers University, USA
* David Blake, NASA-AMES, USA
* Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University, USA (Nobel Laureate 2012)
* Paul Steinhardt, Princeton University, USA
* John Walker, MRC Cambridge, UK (Nobel Laureate 1997)
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute, IL (Nobel Laureate 2009)

*Travel Grants or Free Registrations will be available for Young Scientists*

*Under the Patronage of*
* Italian Association of Crystallography (AIC)
* European Crystallographic Association (ECA)
* International Union of Crystallography (IUCr)

0 Closed Torino2-ritaglio.jpg, nettab304_bestLogo.png 1 0 0

Dear members,

in the hope that it can be of your interest, I'm sending you some information on next NETTAB 2014 workshop and its joint meeting "2014: Crystal (cl)Year".

As you will see, the workshop will be held in Torino, quite near to the French border indeed, from October 16 to 17, 2014, at the Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC) of the local University.

The main theme of the NETTAB 2014 is "From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems biology".
Main topics relate to methods, tools, applications, and perspectives on structural bioinformatics, proteomics and integrative systems biology.

We have already agreed with BMC for the post workshop publication of two supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and of BMC Systems Biology including selected full papers from the workshop.

A synthesis of the main information is reported here below.

You will find the complete call for abstracts and much more information in the events' web sites:
NETTAB 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/
CCY 2014: http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

I hope you will be interested in submitting and attending.

Please don't hesitate to ask for any further information.

Best regards.

Paolo Romano

=====

NETTAB 2014
From high-throughput structural bioinformatics to integrative systems
biology
October 15-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/

Keynote Speakers
* Wolfgang Marwan, Otto-von-Guericke Universität, Magdeburg, Germany
* Ram Samudrala, University of Washington, Seattle, USA
* Torsten Schwede, University of Basel, Switzerland
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel (Nobel
Laureate)

Important dates
* Submission of abstracts for oral communications: July 21, 2014
* Submission of abstracts for posters: September 1, 2014
* Early registration deadline: July 31, 2014

Instructions for abstract submission
Authors are invited to submit abstracts through EasyChair at:
https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=nettab2014 .
Abstract length should not exceed 4 pages for oral communications and 2
pages for posters. Accepted abstracts will be printed in the conference proceedings.

Post-workshop publication
Two special issues will appear as supplements of BMC Bioinformatics and
of BMC Systems Biology. The related Call for papers will be launched shortly after the workshop.

Chairs
Francesca Cordero (University of Torino, Italy)
Paolo Romano (IRCCS AOU San Martino, Italy)
Torsten Schwede (University of Basel, Switzerland)

Under the Patronage of (confirmed only)
* Italian Society of Bioinformatics (BITS)
* Polish Bioinformatics Society (PTBI)
* Rete Ligure di Bioinformatica (ReLiB)

====

*2014: Crystal (cl)Year*
October 16-17, 2014, Molecular Biotechnology Center (MBC), Turin, Italy
http://www.nettab.org/2014/CCY/

*Keynote Speakers*
* Eddy Arnold, Rutgers University, USA
* David Blake, NASA-AMES, USA
* Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University, USA (Nobel Laureate 2012)
* Paul Steinhardt, Princeton University, USA
* John Walker, MRC Cambridge, UK (Nobel Laureate 1997)
* Ada Yonath, Weizmann Institute, IL (Nobel Laureate 2009)

*Travel Grants or Free Registrations will be available for Young Scientists*

*Under the Patronage of*
* Italian Association of Crystallography (AIC)
* European Crystallographic Association (ECA)
* International Union of Crystallography (IUCr)

Tue, 2014-04-15 09:13 Tue, 2014-04-15 16:31 Tue, 2014-04-15 16:31 Tue, 2014-04-15 16:31
18/Feb/2014 Job opportunity, GSK

GSK currently seeks a full-time Computational Biologist based in Stevenage, UK. Ideally we’re looking for someone with some post-doc experience but will also consider PhD students who are recently completing or completed their degree in a relevant subject matter, preferably a mix of bioinformatics and human disease biology.

The closing date is 12th of March.

GSK currently seeks a full-time Computational Biologist based in Stevenage, UK. Ideally we’re looking for someone with some post-doc experience but will also consider PhD students who are recently completing or completed their degree in a relevant subject matter, preferably a mix of bioinformatics and human disease biology.

The closing date is 12th of March.

0 Closed 0 0 0

GSK currently seeks a full-time Computational Biologist based in Stevenage, UK. Ideally we’re looking for someone with some post-doc experience but will also consider PhD students who are recently completing or completed their degree in a relevant subject matter, preferably a mix of bioinformatics and human disease biology.

The closing date is 12th of March.

Mon, 2014-02-17 21:59 Tue, 2014-02-18 09:16 Tue, 2014-02-18 09:16 Tue, 2014-02-18 09:16
08/Feb/2014 TGAC (UK), is seeking for a "Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer"
Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer

We are looking to recruit a Linux and Virtualisation Technical Training Officer to play a key role in the implementation and daily operation of TGAC’s Training Programme.

This would be an excellent role for a self-motivated team player and administrator or Linux expert, who is looking for variety, responsibility and the opportunity to develop their skills. 

 

 

Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer

We are looking to recruit a Linux and Virtualisation Technical Training Officer to play a key role in the implementation and daily operation of TGAC’s Training Programme.

This would be an excellent role for a self-motivated team player and administrator or Linux expert, who is looking for variety, responsibility and the opportunity to develop their skills. 

 

 

0 Closed 0 0 job opportunity, Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer 0
Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer

We are looking to recruit a Linux and Virtualisation Technical Training Officer to play a key role in the implementation and daily operation of TGAC’s Training Programme.

This would be an excellent role for a self-motivated team player and administrator or Linux expert, who is looking for variety, responsibility and the opportunity to develop their skills. 

 

 

Sat, 2014-02-08 13:42 Sat, 2014-02-08 13:42 Sat, 2014-02-08 13:42 Sat, 2014-02-08 13:42
08/Feb/2014 TGAC (UK), is seeking for a "Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer"
Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer

We are looking to recruit a Linux and Virtualisation Technical Training Officer to play a key role in the implementation and daily operation of TGAC’s Training Programme.

This would be an excellent role for a self-motivated team player and administrator or Linux expert, who is looking for variety, responsibility and the opportunity to develop their skills. 

 

 

Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer

We are looking to recruit a Linux and Virtualisation Technical Training Officer to play a key role in the implementation and daily operation of TGAC’s Training Programme.

This would be an excellent role for a self-motivated team player and administrator or Linux expert, who is looking for variety, responsibility and the opportunity to develop their skills. 

 

 

0 Closed 0 0 job opportunity, Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer 1
Linux & Virtualisation Technical Training Officer

We are looking to recruit a Linux and Virtualisation Technical Training Officer to play a key role in the implementation and daily operation of TGAC’s Training Programme.

This would be an excellent role for a self-motivated team player and administrator or Linux expert, who is looking for variety, responsibility and the opportunity to develop their skills. 

 

 

Sat, 2014-02-08 13:42 Sat, 2014-02-08 13:42 Sat, 2014-02-08 13:42 Sat, 2014-02-08 13:42
20/Jan/2014 Online Crowd-Verification of Biological Networks – Be a Part of the Crowd!

The Network Verification Challenge (NVC) – part of the sbv IMPROVER program - is a crowd- approach for the verification and expansion of pre-defined biological networks.

What is it?
sbv IMPROVER is a challenge-based ongoing program with a specific focus on the verification of industrial research processes related to systems biology (read more on www.sbvimprover.com).

Biological networks, with their structured syntax, are a powerful way of representing biological information; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. In NVC, web-based graphical interfaces are used to visualize biological relationships.

Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification aspects are incorporated, to encourage biological domain experts to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified.

Why participating?
The best performers, as of 28 January 2014, will be invited to a 3-day “jamboree” in Switzerland (March 2014) to resolve controversies with subject matter experts.
The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries and remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community.

How to participate?
Learn more on the NVC website  and become part of the scientific community improving the understanding of biological processes.

 

The project team includes scientists from Philip Morris International's (PMI) Research and Development department and IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center. The project is funded by PMI.

The Network Verification Challenge (NVC) – part of the sbv IMPROVER program - is a crowd- approach for the verification and expansion of pre-defined biological networks.

What is it?
sbv IMPROVER is a challenge-based ongoing program with a specific focus on the verification of industrial research processes related to systems biology (read more on www.sbvimprover.com).

Biological networks, with their structured syntax, are a powerful way of representing biological information; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. In NVC, web-based graphical interfaces are used to visualize biological relationships.

Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification aspects are incorporated, to encourage biological domain experts to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified.

Why participating?
The best performers, as of 28 January 2014, will be invited to a 3-day “jamboree” in Switzerland (March 2014) to resolve controversies with subject matter experts.
The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries and remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community.

How to participate?
Learn more on the NVC website  and become part of the scientific community improving the understanding of biological processes.

 

The project team includes scientists from Philip Morris International's (PMI) Research and Development department and IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center. The project is funded by PMI.

0 Closed sbv1-banner.jpg, sbv2.jpg 0 0 0

The Network Verification Challenge (NVC) – part of the sbv IMPROVER program - is a crowd- approach for the verification and expansion of pre-defined biological networks.

What is it?
sbv IMPROVER is a challenge-based ongoing program with a specific focus on the verification of industrial research processes related to systems biology (read more on www.sbvimprover.com).

Biological networks, with their structured syntax, are a powerful way of representing biological information; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. In NVC, web-based graphical interfaces are used to visualize biological relationships.

Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification aspects are incorporated, to encourage biological domain experts to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified.

Why participating?
The best performers, as of 28 January 2014, will be invited to a 3-day “jamboree” in Switzerland (March 2014) to resolve controversies with subject matter experts.
The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries and remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community.

How to participate?
Learn more on the NVC website  and become part of the scientific community improving the understanding of biological processes.

 

The project team includes scientists from Philip Morris International's (PMI) Research and Development department and IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center. The project is funded by PMI.

Mon, 2014-01-20 20:36 Mon, 2014-01-20 20:36 Mon, 2014-01-20 20:36 Mon, 2014-01-20 20:36
20/Jan/2014 Online Crowd-Verification of Biological Networks – Be a Part of the Crowd!

The Network Verification Challenge (NVC) – part of the sbv IMPROVER program - is a crowd- approach for the verification and expansion of pre-defined biological networks.

What is it?
sbv IMPROVER is a challenge-based ongoing program with a specific focus on the verification of industrial research processes related to systems biology (read more on www.sbvimprover.com).

Biological networks, with their structured syntax, are a powerful way of representing biological information; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. In NVC, web-based graphical interfaces are used to visualize biological relationships.

Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification aspects are incorporated, to encourage biological domain experts to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified.

Why participating?
The best performers, as of 28 January 2014, will be invited to a 3-day “jamboree” in Switzerland (March 2014) to resolve controversies with subject matter experts.
The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries and remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community.

How to participate?
Learn more on the NVC website  and become part of the scientific community improving the understanding of biological processes.

 

The project team includes scientists from Philip Morris International's (PMI) Research and Development department and IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center. The project is funded by PMI.

The Network Verification Challenge (NVC) – part of the sbv IMPROVER program - is a crowd- approach for the verification and expansion of pre-defined biological networks.

What is it?
sbv IMPROVER is a challenge-based ongoing program with a specific focus on the verification of industrial research processes related to systems biology (read more on www.sbvimprover.com).

Biological networks, with their structured syntax, are a powerful way of representing biological information; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. In NVC, web-based graphical interfaces are used to visualize biological relationships.

Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification aspects are incorporated, to encourage biological domain experts to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified.

Why participating?
The best performers, as of 28 January 2014, will be invited to a 3-day “jamboree” in Switzerland (March 2014) to resolve controversies with subject matter experts.
The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries and remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community.

How to participate?
Learn more on the NVC website  and become part of the scientific community improving the understanding of biological processes.

 

The project team includes scientists from Philip Morris International's (PMI) Research and Development department and IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center. The project is funded by PMI.

0 Closed sbv1-banner.jpg, sbv2.jpg 1 0 0

The Network Verification Challenge (NVC) – part of the sbv IMPROVER program - is a crowd- approach for the verification and expansion of pre-defined biological networks.

What is it?
sbv IMPROVER is a challenge-based ongoing program with a specific focus on the verification of industrial research processes related to systems biology (read more on www.sbvimprover.com).

Biological networks, with their structured syntax, are a powerful way of representing biological information; however, they can become unwieldy to manage as their size and complexity increase. In NVC, web-based graphical interfaces are used to visualize biological relationships.

Crowdsourcing principles enable participants to annotate these relationships based on literature evidences. Gamification aspects are incorporated, to encourage biological domain experts to gather robust peer-reviewed information from which relationships can be identified and verified.

Why participating?
The best performers, as of 28 January 2014, will be invited to a 3-day “jamboree” in Switzerland (March 2014) to resolve controversies with subject matter experts.
The resulting network models will represent the current status of biological knowledge within the defined boundaries and remain available for continuous use and expansion by the scientific community.

How to participate?
Learn more on the NVC website  and become part of the scientific community improving the understanding of biological processes.

 

The project team includes scientists from Philip Morris International's (PMI) Research and Development department and IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center. The project is funded by PMI.

Mon, 2014-01-20 20:36 Mon, 2014-01-20 20:36 Mon, 2014-01-20 20:36 Mon, 2014-01-20 20:36

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